Teacher Manual

Introduction


Welcome to EzSlate!

This training guide is designed to complement the instructor led training on EzSlate.

  • Each Lesson begins with a list of learning objectives.
  • Every topic has been backed by real-time example.
  • Buttons have been represented as throughout the manual.
  • Screen shots are included to represent how your screen might appear.
  • You can follow the given steps in your system to get hands-on experience and refer to examples to verify results.
  • Some optional features of EzSlate are included at the end of the guide as Appendices.

Feel free to make notes and get hands-on experience in your system. This training guide is for use both during training and for your learning.

 

Lesson 1: Getting Started


Lesson Objectives

  • Logging in
  • Navigating the Dashboard

Getting Started

1.0    How to Log On

Once the administrator has set up a login for you, go to your EzSlate (school.ezslate.com) screen:


Figure 1.1:
Main page of EzSlate

Fill in your “Username” and “Password,” and click on “LOG IN.” This will take you into your dashboard.

Exploring the EzSlate workspace

2.0    Your Class Space

In the dashboard, you can view the courses you are assigned to.

Figure 2: Class Space of EzSlate

Please note that all of the individual sections (called “blocks”) can be shifted around to customize the space to your liking.

Let’s add some content to our course

2.1  How to Edit your course

 

Click on the course you want to add content to. This is where the majority of things happen in your course. This is where you add forums, books, tests, quizzes, online resources and more. To start editing your course page, click on the pencil icon  (at the top right of the page) it will change to power button  icon .

 

This will change the look of the page as shown. Editing pencil icons symbols will now appear next to the existing features, and Add an activity or resource  will now be in each topic box (or week box if you use Weekly format):

Figure 2.1: Course page with editing turned on

 

2.1.1  How to Upload a pdf

We can now add content to each topic. Note that before each “Add an activity or resource” menu there is a “” symbol. This brings pops out the below window that explains what each item is, in case you need help.

Figure 2.1.1a: Choose File to add from resource list

 

Figure 2.1.1b: Uploading Resource

Step 1: Click File to upload a Resource (pdf/ppt/document etc.)

Step 2: General: Add a topic name in the Name and description section if need be.

Step 3: Select files: Drag and drop the file you want to upload.

Step 4: Appearance: Choose Embeded/In Pop-up etc. however you want it appear to your students

Step 5: Click on Save and Display placed at the centre bottom end of the window.

 

2.1.2  How to Add a Page

This resource allows you to post a page of text. To add a text page, select Resource->page from the “Add an activity/resource” menu:

Figure 2.1.2a: Choose a Page to add from resource list

 

You will then see a screen below:

Figure 2.1.2b: Adding a new page screen

 

Step 1: General: The “Name” can be anything relevant to the content being added. This is what the students will see in the classroom.

Step 2:Description” is a brief summary of the main text. It is used to help students quickly determine if the resource is relevant to what they are looking for. The summary box supports formatting (bold, underline, etc.) that can be found on the toolbar.

Step 3: “Display Description on course page” checkbox helps to choose whether you want to display the description or not.

Step 4: Content: Page content” is where the main text is entered. It provides text formatting options and allows link, images, media and files to be inserted.

Step 5: Click on “Save and return to course / Save and Display.” placed at the centre bottom end of the window.

Step 6: Once you are finished with the required settings, click on “Save and return to course / Save and Display.”

 

2.1.3  How to Add an URL

A URL (Uniform or Universal Resource Locator) is a link on the internet to a website or online file. Teachers can use the URL resource to provide their students with web links for research, saving the student time and effort in manually typing out the address.

Figure 2.1.3a: Choose a URL to add from resource list

 

This will take you to a page like this:

Figure 2.1.3b: Adding a new URL to Activity Pop-up

 

Step 1: General: The “Name” can be anything relevant to the URL being provided. This is what the students will see in the course.

Step 2:External URL” is the link you wish to provide as a research resource which is freely available online.

Step 3:Description” is a briefing about the resource link you are providing.

Step 4:Display Description on course page” checkbox helps to choose whether you want to display the description or not.

Step 5: Appearance: Choose Embeded/In Pop-up etc. however you want it appear to your students

Step 6: Click on “Save and return to course / Save and Display.” placed at the centre bottom end of the window.

 

2.1.4 How to Add a Folder

This resource allows the students to view an entire folder at once. The directory and the files in it must already exist. You can upload only zipped folders through the file upload option. It is a great way to make many files available using just one link. The folder can be unzipped and viewed. To add a folder, click on Add an activity or resource->folder. Select the zipped folder either from a website or from local system.

Figure 2.1.4a: Choose a folder to add from resource list

 

This brings up a screen like this:

Figure 2.1.4b: Adding a new folder to Activity Pop-up

 

Step 1: General: Name” – this can be anything you like (it does not have to be the same as the name of the directory).

Step 2:Description” is a briefing about the resource link you are providing.

Step 3:Display Description on course page” checkbox helps to choose whether you want to display the description or not.

Step 4: Content: Files – Drag and drop fall the files you need to be displayed in the folder

Step 5: Display folder contents – Choose “On a separate page” always

  • Show subfolders expanded – Checked by default, uncheck if you don’t want to display the subfolders expanded
  • Show download folder button – Checked by default, uncheck if you don’t want the students to download the folder
  • Force download of files – Checked by default, uncheck if you don’t want the files to automatically download.

Step 6: Click on “Save and return to course / Save and Display.” placed at the centre bottom end of the window.

 

2.1.5 How to add a Label

This feature allows you to insert text, images, link, code, and sound or video directly into the topic (or week) box.

Labels may be used

  • To split up a long list of activities with a subheading or an image
  • To display an embedded sound file or video directly on the course page
  • To add a short description to a course section

To add a label, click Add an activity or resource -> Label and then click Add:

Figure 2.1.5a: Choose a label to add from resource list

 

This will take you to the label editing page:

Figure 2.1.5b: Adding a new label to Activity Pop-up

 

You may now type what you want to add to the course topic (or create a link, or add a picture, etc.).

Step1: General: Label text – Add the label name.

Step 2: When you are done, click on “Save and return to course.”

This covers all of the options under “Resource” list in the “Add an activity/resource” menu.

 

Preparing to assess the students

3.0    How to Add Activities

The activity list allows you to add assignments, attendance, chat, choice, database, forums, and more. These differ from resources in that they are interactive and in some cases require student participation. There are several options available under activities in the “Add an activity/resource” menu:

  1. Assignment
  2. Attendance
  3. Chat
  4. Choice
  5. Feedback
  6. Glossary
  7. Quiz
  8. Wiki

 

3.1      How to add an Assignment

To add an assignment, click on “Assignment” under the “Add an activity/resource” menu. This will take you to the “Adding a new Assignment to topic” screen:

Figure 3.1a: Adding a new assignment to Activity Pop-up

Again, notice there are “” symbols next to each menu to help explain what each does.

Figure 3.1b: Assignment screen

 

Step 1: General: The “Assignment name” can be anything you like.

Step 2: The “Description” describes the assignment. The description box has a formatting toolbar to edit the entered text (bold, underline, images, etc.).

Step 3: The “Submission type” field gives you the option of allowing students to do File submissions where the students can upload one or more files as submission or Online text which allows students to directly type rich text into an editor field for submission. If you allow File Submissions, then select the maximum submission size to 20MB. This size enough for most submissions including PowerPoints.

Figure 3.1c: Accepted file types under submission

 

Step 4: The Word Limit field can be enabled and set by the teacher when Online text submission is set.

Step 5: The “Maximum number of uploaded files” helps you to set the limit to the number of files a student can upload.

Step 6: The “Feedback types” – teachers can give feedback to students in various ways. For online text submissions,

if you set “Comment inline” to ‘yes’, the submission text will be copied into the feedback comment field during grading, making it easier to comment inline (using a different colour, perhaps) or to edit the original text.

Step 7: When finished I hit “Save and return to course/Save and display.

Feedback comments – allows you to leave comments about the students’ submissions as well as grades.

Feedback files – allows you to upload files with feedback when marking. These files may be the marked up student assignments, documents with comments, a completed marking guide, or spoken audio feedback.

You can enable one or more feedback types while creating assignments.

The “Maximum attempts” field allows students to resubmit the assignment based on the number set in this field. If the maximum is set to 1 then the student cannot resubmit the assignment.

Grade” sets the grade as either a simple grade points (from 1-100) or as a custom word-based scale set up in the “Scales” section under gradebook (see earlier section).

Notice that as a teacher, you have the option to view submitted assignments and the grade assigned (if any). To go back to the main screen, click on the course short name in the upper left (Science in my example).

 

3.2      How to add an Attendance

Attendance module allows the teacher to take attendance during class hours and the students can view their own attendance record, if the attendance activity is not hidden. A teacher can create multiple sessions and mark attendance for all sessions, once the attendance activity is added to a course. The attendance status can be set to “Present”, “Absent”, “Late”, or “Excused”. These status descriptions are configurable, and more can be added.

Attendance reports are available for the entire class or for individual students. In the “Add an activity/resource” menu, under activities, you can select Attendance.

Figure 3.2a: Adding a new attendance to Activity Pop-up

The resulting screen looks like this:

Figure 3.2b: Attendance Screen

 

Here, the teacher can view sessions (monthly, weekly and daily format), add a new session, view reports, export attendance reports in excel/open office/text formats, update settings, and view/add/edit/delete/merge temporary users. You can also delete or change the duration for viewing the attendance.

 

Step 1: General:Name” – Enter any name for attendance and click on “Save and return to course/Save and display”.

Figure 3.2c: Attendance created

 

Step 2: To repeat the attendance, once created go back to the Subject page and open “Attendance”.

Step 3: Double click on the newly created Attendance and go to “Add session” –  you can add sessions to create a one off lesson or you can edit “Multiple Sessions” for repeat lessons for the academic year or any time frame you need.

Step 4: Once selected, “Add” to save.

 

3.3      How to add a Chat

A chat activity lets you create a chat room. It is used for live-time discussions. EzSlate also supplies a bulletin-board discussion space (see “Forum” below). The main difference is that chat is a very efficient way to discuss things in live-time. If you expect your students to log in over several days at different times, then the forum is a better choice. You can also view previous chats by clicking on the ‘View past chat sessions’ link on the chat screen.

When you add a chat, you should get a screen like this:

Figure 3.2a: Adding a new chat to Activity Pop-up

Step 1: General: Name of this chat room – You can enter a name for your chat room.

Step 2: Description – You can type a brief description about the chat room. Whatever you type will appear on the chat room’s introductory screen. You can format the text in this box using the toolbar available on the top of the box.

Step 3: Chat Sessions: Next chat time – This is to advertise to students when to enter the chat room. Students may enter the chat room before the scheduled time, but this is useful to organize the start of a chat session.

Step 4: Repeat/publish session times – This sets whether or not to advertise when the chat room will be in session. You can choose one of the following – Don’t publish chat times, no repeats-publish the specified time only, at the same time every day, and at the same time every week.

Step 5: Save past sessions – This is where you set how long a chat room should be archived (from two days to “never delete messages”).

Step 6: Everyone can view past sessions – you can decide here whether or not allow everyone to view past chat sessions. Note that teachers can always view past chat sessions.

Step 7: Common module setting: Availability – Select whether to show or hide from the students.

Step 8: Once complete click on “Save and return to course”

 

3.4      How to add a Choice

A choice is basically a poll. When you add a choice, you ask a question, and supply two or more answers to the question. Then students may vote. This only asks one question at a time, so works well as a poll, but would not work well as a multiple choice test (that is under the quiz module). To add a “Choice,” select “Choice” from the “Add an activity or resource->Activities” menu.

This will take you to the “Choice” screen:

Figure 3.4a: Adding a new choice to Activity Pop-up

 

Step 1: General: Choice Name” – this can be the name of the poll.

Step 2:Description” – enter the poll question here. The question text can be formatted using the toolbar.

Step 3: Options: Option 1…. n” – in the options settings, enter the options available for the students to select from and submit their poll.

You can set when the responses can be given by students and till what time under the availability settings. You can also choose to allow the students to preview their responses before submission. In the “results settings” you can choose to post the results of the choice – do not publish results to students, show results to students after they answer, show results to students only after the choice is closed, and always show results to students. You then choose how the results are displayed: with student names, or anonymously. You may also select if you want students to see a list of who has not yet answered the choice with the “Show column for unanswered” field (teachers always see who has not yet answered) and whether or not to “Include responses from inactive/suspended users”. Step 4: Once done, you can click on “Save and return to course/Save and display”.

If you click on the “Choice name (“Assessment of learning”), you can see how the “Choice” looks, or vote on the options, or view results. To return to the main screen, click on the class short name in the upper left.

 

3.5      How to add a Feedback

This activity module allows you to create a custom survey for collecting feedback from participants using a variety of question types including multiple choice, yes/no or text input.

Feedback responses may be anonymous if desired, and results may be shown to all participants or restricted to teachers only. Any feedback activities on the site front page may also be completed by non-logged-in users.

Feedback activities may be used

  • For course evaluations, helping improve the content for later participants
  • To enable participants to sign up for course modules, events etc.
  • For guest surveys of course choices, school policies etc.
  • For anti-bullying surveys in which students can report incidents anonymously

The Adding a new feedback to topic screen looks like this:

Figure 3.5a: Adding a new feedback to topic screen

 

Step 1: General: Name” – this will form the link where students will click on to view the feedback. Hence, give a name that serves the purpose.

Step 2:Description” – give a brief description for the feedback instance here. If you want to expand the toolbar, click the icon on the top left and drag the bottom right of the text box.

Step 3: Availability section:Allow Answers from/to” – this allows you to choose as to when the students can complete the feedback.

Step 4: Question and Submission settings:  “Record user names” – you can decide here whether or not to show the names of users who complete the feedback.

Step 5:Allow multiple submissions” – it is set to “NO” by default. If set to “YES” then the students can submit more than one feedback.

Step 6: After Submission: “Completion message” – you can leave a reply to students here. This will be visible once the students submit feedback.

Once done, click on “Save and return to course/Save and display”. The feedback module added will be shown in the course topic.

You can click on edit questions tab to add questions to your feedback activity. “Add a question” is a dropdown menu which lists a set of question type, which you can choose from. Once you add questions here, you can view the questions in the Edit questions tab.

Alternatively, you can import/export questions using template in .xml format. The Analysis tab shows you the responses and an analysis chart of the responses. Show Responses tab will show you the list of responses submitted.

 

3.6      How to add a Glossary

The “Glossary” activity module enables participants to create and maintain a list of definitions, like a dictionary, or to collect and organize resources or information. A teacher can allow files to be attached to glossary entries. Attached images are displayed in the entry. Entries can be searched or browsed alphabetically or by category, date or author. Entries can be approved by default or require approval by a teacher before they can be viewed by everyone.

 

If the glossary auto-linking filter is enabled, entries will be automatically linked where the concept words and/or phrases appear within the course. For example, if you define the term “plastic” and the word plastic comes up in a forum discussion, the word plastic will appear as a link that will take the user to the definition.

If you want to add words to existing glossary,

Step 1: Go to the course in question, select the chapter and the glossary you want to add the words to. In my example below I want to add a word to the glossary in chapter Chemical Reactions & Equity of Chemistry course –

Figure 3.6a: Glossary screen

 

Step 2: Click on the Glossary and you will go to your below glossary page

Figure 3.6b: Glossary screen

Note the search option at the top of the page. If you do not check the “Search full text” box, then the search only looks for the term names.  If the “Search full text” box is checked, the system will search through every word. This can take longer and return more entries than you might wish, but it is thorough.

Step 3: Adding a new entry – if you click on the “Add new entry” tab, you will see a screen like this:

Step 4: General: You must specify the “Concept” field.

Step 5: You may add keywords that the system will link to this definition if those words are used. For example, if I define “acarology” with a keyword of “mites,” then the system will link to the definition of “acarology” if someone uses “mites” in a discussion.

Step 6: You may also put the term into a category if you have any defined. You then can fill in the “Definition” field, and can attach any attachments you want to.

Step 7: When you are done, click on “Save changes.”

 

3.7      How to add a Quiz

The quiz activity enables a teacher to create quizzes comprising questions of various types, including multiple choice, matching, short-answer and numerical. The teacher can allow the quiz to be attempted multiple times, with the questions shuffled or randomly selected from the question bank. A time limit may be set. Each attempt is marked automatically, with the exception of essay questions, and the grade is recorded in the gradebook. The teacher can choose when and if hints, feedback and correct answers are shown to students.

Quizzes may be used

  • As course exams
  • As mini tests for reading assignments or at the end of a topic
  • As exam practice using questions from past exams
  • To deliver immediate feedback about performance
  • For self-assessment

To add a “Quiz”, select “Quiz” from the “Add an activity/resource” menu.

Figure 3.7a: Adding a new Quiz to Activity Pop-up

 

This takes you to the “Quiz” editing screen:

Figure 3.7b: Quiz added to course topic displayed

 

Again, there are help buttons available if you need them (the “” symbols).

Step 1: General: Name – you can name the quiz as required.

Step 2: Description – this is the brief description of the quiz. You can add full formatting using the formatting tools (bold, italics, etc.).

Step 3: Timing: Open the quiz – this sets the opening date and time for the quiz. Students cannot take the quiz before this time.

Step 4: Close the quiz – this sets the ending date and time of the quiz. Students cannot take the quiz after the close time.

Step 5: Submission grace period – If “when time expires” is set to ‘There is a grace period when open attempts can be submitted, but no more questions answered’, this is the amount of extra time that is allowed.

Step 6: Time limit – this sets how long a student has to take the quiz (1-110 minutes). The default is “0,” which means the student can take as much time as needed.

Step 7: Grade: Grading method – this allows you to set how quizzes are scored if the student can take the quiz multiple times. You can choose from keeping the highest grade, keeping the average of all the grades, keeping the first score, or keeping the latest score.

Step 8: Attempts allowed – this sets the number of times a student may take a quiz. This can be very useful if the quiz is a review exercise, as the student can take it as many times as the teacher wants (and each grade does get reported to the teacher).

Step 9: Each attempt builds on the last – this sets whether or not the quiz builds on previous quizzes. If multiple attempts of a quiz are allowed, and this is set to “Yes,” then the former quiz results will be included in this attempt (including feedback, if turned on). If this option is set to “no,” then the quiz will be a fresh (blank) quiz every time the student takes it.

Step 10: Question Behaviour: Shuffle within questions – this changes the order of the questions on the quiz every time the student takes it (or for every different student who takes the quiz). This helps to prevent students from copying each other.

Step 11: How questions behave –  this setting allows you to immediately give a student feedback on a question. You type the feedback into the question when you create it (more on that below). To activate this option, set this to “Yes.”

Step 12: Review Options: Will remain as default

  • Grade to pass – This setting determines the minimum grade required to pass. The value is used in activity and course completion, and in the gradebook, where pass grades are highlighted in green and fail grades in red.

Step 13: Once you are done, click on “save and return to course/save and display”. The resulting quiz added screen will look like this:

Figure 3.7c: Course view

This will take you to a screen like this:

Figure 3.7d: Quiz Screen

 

To start building on the quiz – Click on “Settings on the top left-hand corner, a settings pop-up as below will appear. Click on “Edit Quiz”.

Figure 3.7e: Settings Screen

 

This will take you to the Editing quiz page like this:

Figure 3.7f: Editing quiz screen

 

Click on “Add” at the right bottom of the question after which you want to add the question.

Click on the drop down to select the type of question to add. There are three options available to add questions to the quiz:

  • a new question – this will list the type of questions you can add to your quiz. The list of available question types is:
    • Multiple choice – Allows the selection of a single or multiple responses from a pre-defined list.
    • True/False – A simple form of multiple choice question with just the two choices ‘True’ and ‘False’.
    • Matching – The answer to each of a number of sub-question must be selected from a list of possibilities.
    • Short Answer – Allows a response of one or a few words that is graded by comparing against various model answers, which may contain wildcards.
    • Numerical – Allows a numerical response, possibly with units, that is graded by comparing against various model answers, possibly with tolerances.
    • Essay – Allows a response of a few sentences or paragraphs. This must then be graded manually.
    • Calculated – Calculated questions are like numerical questions but with the numbers used and selected randomly from a set when the quiz is taken.
    • Calculated multichoice – Calculated multichoice questions are like multichoice questions. Which choice elements can include formula results from numeric values are selected randomly from a set when the quiz is taken.
    • Calculated simple – A simpler version of calculated questions which are like numerical questions but with the numbers used selected randomly from a set when the quiz is taken.
    • Drag and drop into text – Missing words in the question text are filled in using drag and drop.
    • Drag and drop markers – Markers are dragged and dropped onto a background image.
    • Drag and drop into image – Images or text labels are dragged and dropped into drop zones on a background image.
    • Embedded answers (Cloze) – Questions of this type are very flexible, but can only be created by entering text containing special codes that create embedded multiple-choice, short answers and numerical questions.
    • Random short-answer matching – Like a Matching question, but created randomly from the short answer questions in a particular category.
    • Select missing words – Missing words in the question text are filled in using dropdown menus.
    • Description – This is not actually a question. Instead it is a way to add some instructions, rubric or other content to the activity. This is similar to the way that labels can be used to add content to the course page.
  • Add questions from question bank – this will ask you to select a category from which you can add questions from the already available question bank from the database.
  • Add a random question – this gives you two options:
    • Random question from an existing category – here you can select from a list of available categories and then add questions from the database.
    • Random question using a new category – you can create a new category and then add a new question to the quiz.

 

3.7.1           How to add a Multiple Choice Questions

To add a multiple choice question, select Multiple Choice in the “Add a new question” menu. To get to this menu please refer from figures 3.7c to 3.7f.

Figure 3.7.1a Add a new question” menu

Step 1: Select “Multiple choice” and “Add” to add a question. This will take you to the multiple choice question screen:

Figure 3.7.1b: : Adding a multiple choice question to quiz

 

This works like a standard multiple choice question.

Step 2: General: Select the category to add the question to.

Step 3: Type in the Question name (something to help you identify the question in the list). The “Question text” box allows formatting (bold, italics, etc.) by using the formatting toolbar above the text area. Enter the question in Question text box. You do not have to type the answers in the “Question text” box – the program will list the answers you type in the various “Choice #” boxes.

You may then select if students are allowed to select more than one answer, or if there is only one answer allowed.

You may then fill in your answers for the multiple choice question, and include feedback text if you wish.

Step 4: One or multiple answers? Section – Leave default “One answer only” if only one is right else choose “Multiple answers allowed” in case you want to give more than one correct option for the question.

Something that is different for multiple choice questions is they have weight. The positive answers must add up to 100%, or the system will ask if that is what you want to do. You do have the option to assign negative weight to an answer, such that a wrong answer might actually count against the student, instead of being no credit. This might be true where multiple answers are possible, such that A) is worth 50%, B) is worth -50% and C) is worth 50%. A student selecting A) and C) would get full credit, but a student selecting A) and B) would get no credit at all. You do have the option to make a wrong answer not count either way as well.

Step 5: Answers: Section to put in the answer choices.

When you are done filling in your questions, answers, feedback, and grade, click on “Save changes.” You should go back to the quiz screen again, with the new question listed.

 

3.7.2           How to add a True/False Questions

The questions are just that – true/false. To add a true/false question, select True/False from the “Add a new question” menu.  To get to this menu please refer from figures 3.7c to 3.7f.

Figure 3.7.2a Add a new question menu

This will take you to a screen like this:

Figure 3.7.2b: Adding a True/False question to quiz

 

Step 1: General – Select the category, enter the Question name – any name as you require it to be, Question text – enter the question here.

Step 2: Enter a Feedback for the response True and a Feedback for the response False.

Step 3: Once you are done, click on “Save changes”.

 

3.7.3           How to add a Matching Questions

To create a Matching question, select Matching from the “Add a new question” menu. To get to this menu please refer from figures 3.7c to 3.7f.

Figure 3.7.3a Add a new question menu

This will bring you to the Matching screen like this:

Figure 3.7.3b: Adding a matching question to quiz

 

Step 1: Select the category, enter the Question name, enter the question in the Question text box, and enter Question# and Answer. Step 2: At least enter two questions and 3 answers, 1 answer can be wrong.

Step 3: Click on “Save Changes” to exit.

 

3.7.4           How to add a Short Answer Questions

To create a short answer question, select Short Answer from the “Add a new question” menu. To get to this menu please refer from figures 3.7c to 3.7f

Figure 3.7.4a: Add a new question menu

This will bring you to the short answer question screen:

Figure 3.7.4a: Adding a short answer question to quiz

 

Step 1: General: Select the category, enter the Question name, enter the question in the Question text box.

Step 2: Answers: Enter at least one right answer in the Answer# box with a grade and feedback.

You can also use wildcards like ‘*’ to match any characters.

Step 3: Grade can be 100% when the answer is right and None when the answer is wrong. Feedback could be “right” for a correct answer and “wrong” for a mistake.

Step 4: Once you are finished, click on “Save changes.”

 

3.7.5           How to add an Essay Questions

The essay question type is intended for answers of a paragraph or two which is often found in exams. If you want longer essays, choose Online text assignment or Upload a single file assignment.  To add an essay type question in the Quiz, select the “Essay” in the “Add a new question” menu. To get to this menu please refer from figures 3.7c to 3.7f.

Figure 3.7.5a: Add a new question menu

 

This will take you to a screen like this:

Figure 3.7.5b: Adding an essay question to quiz

 

Step 1: Select a category, enter the Question name, enter the question in the Question text box,

Step 2: Enter response template if any.

Step 3: Once done, click on “Save changes”. This will return to the quiz screen where the question will be added.

 

3.7.6           How to add a Description type Questions

A description is not really a question type. It simply enables text to be displayed without requiring any answers, similar to a label on the course page. The question text is displayed both during the attempt and on the review page. Any general feedback is displayed on the review page only.

To add a description, select “Description” from the “Add a new question” menu. To get to this menu please refer from figures 3.7c to 3.7f.

Figure 3.7.6a: Add a new question menu.

The description editing screen looks like this:


Figure 3.7.6b:
Adding a description question to quiz

 

Step 1: Fill in the “Question name” with a name that will help you remember the description.

Step 2: In the “Question text” box, fill in your description (story, article, etc.). If you have uploaded pictures in the “Files” section, you can choose to display them with the description (so your description can describe a picture).

Step 3: When everything is filled as required, click on “Save changes.” Your description should now appear in the list of questions.

 

3.7.7            How to add a Question bank

You can also add questions to the quiz from the existing question bank. To add a question from Question Bank menu please refer from figures 3.7c to 3.7f.

Figure 3.7.7a: Adding from a Question Bank

Step 1: click Add drop down menu and select “+ from Question Bank”. A pop-up screen appears like this:

Figure 3.7.7b: Adding question from question bank to quiz screen

 

Step 1: In this screen, you can change the category if you want to choose a question from a different category and select the question(s) by using the checkbox.

Step 2: Once you are done selecting the questions you need, click on Add selected questions to the quiz.

The questions are added to the quiz and the screen looks like this:

Figure 3.7.7c: Added questions

 

To go back to the Quiz screen, you can click on the quiz name in the path.

 

3.8      How to add a Wiki

This adds a Wiki to you course. The wiki activity module enables participants to add and edit a collection of web pages. A wiki can be collaborative (everyone can edit it), or individual, (everyone have their own wiki only which they can edit).

A history of previous versions of each page in the wiki is maintained, listing the edits made by each participant. Wikis have many uses, such as

  • For group lecture notes or study guides
  • For members of a faculty to plan a scheme of work or meeting agenda together
  • For students to collaboratively author an online book, creating content on a topic set by their tutor
  • For collaborative storytelling or poetry creation, where each participant writes a line or verse
  • As a personal journal for examination notes or revision (using an individual wiki)

To add a wiki, select “Wiki” from the “Add an activity/resource” menu.

Figure 3.8a Adding a Wiki from the Activity Pop-up

 

This will take you to the “Adding a new Wiki” screen:

Figure 3.8b: Adding a new Wiki to course screen

 

Step1: General: Wiki name – give a meaningful name to your wiki.

Step 2: Description – explain the purpose of your wiki here.

Step 3: Wiki mode – you can choose between Individual wiki (each students gets his own wiki) and Collaborative wiki (all students work together on one single wiki).

Step 4: First page name – Title of the first page of the wiki.

Step 5: Format: Default format – This setting determines the default format used when editing wiki pages.

  • HTML – The HTML editor is available
  • Creole – A common wiki mark-up language for which a small edit toolbar is available
  • NwikiMediawiki– like mark-up language used in the contributed Nwiki module

Step 6: Force format – If the format is forced (checkbox ticked), there is no option for students to choose a format when editing a wiki page.

 

When you have all of the options set, click on “Save and display.” You will then go to a screen where you can add a new page to wiki:

Figure 3.8c: Adding a new page to Wiki from the Wiki main page

 

Step 1: Click on create page to continue. This will take you to the editing page where you can add the actual content to the wiki:

Figure 3.8d: Editing Wiki page screen

 

Step 2: You can enter the wiki contents in the HTML format box.

Step 3: You can click on preview before saving to ensure the contents are displayed the way you want them to be.

Search Wikis – if you have existing pages in the wiki, you can search for terms using this field on the top left corner of the screen .

 

The wiki page has 7 tabs:

  • View – this is the default tab. The View tab at the top or link in the navigation block allows users to display and view the wiki page.
  • Edit – The Edit tab at the top or link in the navigation block allows users to edit the wiki page.
  • Comments – The Comments tab at the top or link in the navigation block allows users to see and add comments about the wiki.
  • History – The History tab at the top or link in the navigation block allows users to see what has been altered in the wiki. Compare edits by clicking the . Click the version you wish to restore if the latest edit is unsuitable.
  • Map – The Map tab at the top or link in the navigation block allows users to view areas of the wiki such as a list of pages (as in the following screenshot), updated or orphaned pages etc. (Orphaned pages are pages not linked to anywhere.) To select what you want to see, click the Map menu dropdown box.
  • Files – The Files tab at the top or link in the navigation block allows users to access any files which have been added to the wiki. By default, the Teacher role can add and manage files to the Files tab, but the Student role can only view them. You could change this though with a permissions override to the Manage wiki files capability (mod/wiki:managefiles) in any particular wiki.
  • Administration – The Administration tab at the top or link in the navigation block is available to editing teachers in the course, so they can delete page versions or selected pages. Clicking the will list available pages to delete. The first page of the wiki cannot be deleted.

You have the option to preview the page if you like, or you can cancel the changes you made. Once you are happy with the page, click on “Save.”

I have a Wiki called “Science of Electricity” in my example:

Figure 3.8d: Wiki added to topic displayed

If you have any questions, remember to click on the “” symbols – EzSlate’s help is very good.

 

How to add mathematical questions to EzSlate?

EzSlate supports TeX and Algebra notation to add mathematical expressions anywhere in a module.

4.      Algebra

There are a couple of ways to add mathematical expressions. For very simple expressions, you can use the superscript and the subscript functions in the html editors. For complex ones below are the steps to follow –

Step 1: Go to the Assignment/Assessment and Click on Edit drop down and select Edit Settings.

Figure 4a: Assignment from Chapter view

This will open the below page:

Figure 4b: Adding mathematical expressions using Equation editor

 

Step 2: Click on “Show/hide advanced buttons” in the “Description” section as highlighted in Figure 4b. This should dropdown additional buttons.

Step 3:  Choose the section of the question where you want to add to your mathematical expressions.

Step 4: Click on “Equation editor” . This should open the below pop-up:

Figure 4b: Adding mathematical expressions using Equation editor

Step 5: Explore all the four tabs (from Operators to Advanced) to form the mathematical expressions you want.

More complicated expressions (fractions, calculus, etc.) need more advanced formatting, using the algebra filter. This filter uses coding to create mathematical expressions. The good news is that it is very simple to use. The code looks like a mathematical expression you would type (like x^2 = y), except you enclose it in double “@” signs, like this: @@x^2 = y@@. The filter is flexible and can ignore spacing: @@xy=z@@ is the same as @@ x y = z @@. The filter can make full use of parentheses for organization, so @@(length)/(height)@@ is a valid expression.

Here are some examples of what the input into Moodle would look like, with the corresponding output:

Figure 4d: Example mathematical expressions to input

 

More complicated expressions – TeX

 EzSlate supports TeX notation for more complicated mathematical expressions. TeX expressions are always enclosed in double $. A TeX expression looks like $$sinx^2$$. Since TeX expressions can be more complicated, I suggest sticking with algebra notation unless you know TeX or need to learn it.


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